John Lewis RIP

John Lewis RIP

John Lewis was a national hero, treasure and warrior for what is right and just in this world. He dedicated his life, and put his life on the line to secure voting rights and equal rights for African Americans across this country. I was fortunate enough to call him a friend. I am deeply saddened for his family and for this country. We lost a fighter who never, ever would back down, no matter the odds. My thoughts, prayers and condolences go out to his family. Let us use this time to remember his life and his unwavering commitment to equality and justice. Let us use this time to rededicate ourselves to the fights that we still have yet to win, the fights Congressman Lewis was fighting for, an end to gun violence in this country, a fair and equitable economy for all Americans and most importantly the right for all Americans, black, white, latino, asian, indigenous, LGBTQ to be treated fairly and to be able to cast their vote without fear, intimidation and easily. Let us remember to all get in good trouble, because right now, good trouble is what this country desperately needs. Rest In Peace, Power and Happiness my friend. – Reena Evers-Everette

James Charles Evers: September 11, 1922 – July 22, 2020

James Charles Evers: September 11, 1922 – July 22, 2020

James Charles Evers
September 11, 1922 – July 22, 2020

It is with a heavy heart that we announce the passing of Charles Evers. He lived a proud and productive life as a civil rights activist, elected official, entrepreneur and radio personality.

As young boys growing up in Decatur, Mississippi, Charles and Medgar Evers faced racial adversity, thus vowing to ensuring diversity as they entered adulthood. More importantly, these brothers committed to strengthening equity, civility, social justice and the achievement of parity. In the 1950s and early 1960s, Medgar was the esteemed leader of the Mississippi movement.

After the death of Medgar, Charles ascended to Executive Secretary for the Mississippi NAACP. He later became Mayor of Fayette, Mississippi and later ran unsuccessfully for Governor of Mississippi and United States Senator.

Charles and Medgar believed in the theory and concepts of integration. They often said, “in order to ‘integrate’, you must be able to ‘enter great’ with honor and sincerity.”

The Evers Institute will continue to manifest the high ideas and principles that Charles and Medgar Evers strove for during this sojourn on earth.